Riboud, Marc

Marc Riboud, born in 1923 in Saint-Genis-Laval in Lyon, took his first photographs in 1937 using a small vest pocket Kodak at the Exposition Universelle in Paris. In 1944, he jointed the Resistance in the Vercors. From 1945 to 1948 he studied engineering at the École Centrale in Lyon and then starts to work in a factory. Three years later he decided to become a photographer. The picture "The Painter on the Eiffel Tower" was his first publication in Life Magazine 1953. Invited by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Robert Capa, he joined the agency Magnum Photos.

From 1955 Marc Riboud traveled extensively in the Middle East, Afghanistan, India, China and Japan. After a three-month stay in the USSR, he moved to Algeria and sub-Saharan Africa in 1960, where he depicted the struggles for independence photographically.
As one of the few photographers allowed entry, he created photographic reports in South and North Vietnam in 1968-1969. In the 1980s and 1990s, he regularly returned to Southeast Asia, especially Angkor and Huang Shan.

In 2011 Marc Riboud donated to the Musée National d'Art Moderne at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris a total of 192 original photographs from the period between 1953 and 1977. His work has exhibited in numerous museums and galleries in Paris, New York, Shanghai, Tokyo, etc. He received many awards, including two from the Overseas Press Club, the ICP Infinity Award and the Nadar prize for his book "Into the Orient".

Marc Riboud was 93 years old when he died in Paris on August 30, 2016.


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